… from that neverland between the holidays —

Swimming through the Holiday simples –

Yesterday when I visited my Dr. for my regular check up, between reporting in and scurrying quickly off into the more fun subject of gardening, we briefly touched on language, specifically the Ozarks dialect. He said he’d used the word “addled” in front of his nurses and none of them knew what he meant. I said I too wasn’t really clear on the definition, but I’m pretty sure when I’m there.
The word “simples” as used above, is another such term, only instead of having no clear definition, it has at least three. Having the simples, as a noun, describes a condition where one is so worn out by too much input, events, experiences, overeating and generally going too many ways at once as to be somewhat addled and techy, i.e. confused and uncertain as to what’s the next appropriate response.
The second reference, being “simple,” describes a person who is innocent, naive, clueless, a condition sometimes described in this culture as being blond.
But if you’re an herbalist or unschooled naturopath, a “granny woman,” then you have a command of the “simples,” meaning plant lore or herbal medicines.
So if I treat my addledness with some herb tea, would I simply put, be being simple if I rely on taking the
simples for my simples?
I’ll sure be glad when these holidays are over with so I can get back to work.
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About yarnspinnerpress

Story teller, retired journalist, author, folksinger, folklorist, gardener.
This entry was posted in Tidbits and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to … from that neverland between the holidays —

  1. Sarah Birch Land says:

    Simply, well put.

  2. Donna L. Potts says:

    The Old English term for gout was “fot-adl”–foot addle–so it USED to have weight in the medical profession! That’s what I’ve told my students, who’ve never heard of being “addle-brained.”

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